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5 search results for: lupine

1

Lupines

Wildflower Seeds by Sandy Swegel One way to design your garden is to plan ahead, make sketches and get all of your seeds started indoors 8 weeks before frost.  Another way, for those of us not quite so organized, is to add a plant you absolutely fall in love with, no matter what the time […]

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Lupine, Silver – Lupinus argenteus

Silver Lupine is native to the western United States and prefers rocky, sandy soils. It’s small blue to violet to pink to white blooms are arranged into a showy display along a tall spike. The palmate leaves are silvery-green in color.  This plant can be found in forests, meadows, bogs, along roadsides and in disturbed areas.

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Lupine, Russell – Lupinus polyphyllus

This perennial member of the Pea family has tall, dense spikes of purple, pink, red, white and yellow flowers rising above deep green robust foliage that resemble palm leaves.  Native to the Pacific states and the North Eastern areas of North America the plants will bloom for a two month period, from May to July, the second spring from seeding.  Plant in slightly acidic soil that is well drained.  Sandy, rocky soil will allow the tap root to grow well.  Nick the hard seed coat or soak overnight before direct planting 1/4 inch deep.   Keep the soil moist until the seedling is 3-4 inches tall.  No need for fertilization, but lupines like regular irrigation.  These are great for wildflower gardens and meadows, but also do well as accents in perennial garden flower beds and make great cut flowers.

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Lupine, Perennial – Lupinus perennis

This beautiful drought tolerant species will send up tall spikes of flowers in varying shades of blue/violet to white over silvery-green foliage.  A great choice for partially sunny locations.  Some species of this deer resistant plant are toxic to livestock in the early growth and seed stages.  A native to the eastern states from Maine to Florida and west to Minnesota and Indiana, this species is found growing in open woods, clearings and sandy prairies.  This is the only food for the larva of the Karner Blue Butterfly.  These are great for wildflower gardens and meadows, but also do well as accents in perennial garden flower beds and make great cut flowers.